17 Shark Species Now Face Extinction

by    DiveSSI    27th March 2019
1_Mako
Shortfin Mako (Isurus oxyrinchus) - (c) Mark Conlin, SWFSC
Shortfin Mako
Shortfin Mako (Isurus oxyrinchus) - (c) Patrick Doll
3_Mako
Longfin mako (Isurus paucus) - (c) NOAA

Updated IUCN Red List lists threatened sharks The Shark Specialist Group (SSG) of the World Conservation Union (IUCN) has published updated the Red List Reviews for 58 shark species and rays: 17 species are threatened with extinction. "Our findings are alarming but not surprising, as we find that sharks, which are particularly slow-growing, which are coveted and furthermore are unprotected from over-fishing, tend to be the most threatened species," explains Professor Nicholas Dulvy of SSG. "We are particularly worried about the shortfin mako, whose stock has declined by 60 percent in the Atlantic in about 75 years." The closely related longfin mako was also classified as endangered. Mako sharks migrate over long distances, multiply only at an advanced age and are valued in many (Asian) countries both for their meat and for their fins, but are not subject to any international quotas. "More than half of the Australian species tested were found to be of least concern, largely due to the introduction of fishing margins," explains Dr. Peter Kyne from Charles Darwin University, who acts as coordinator of the SSG Red List Authority. "The nine Australian sharks, who continue to be seriously endangered, are mostly deep-sea species that grow exceptionally slowly and are therefore poorly equipped to withstand even modest fishing pressures, particularly the Greeneye shark (Spiny Dogfish), whose nearly three-year pregnancies are the longest in the animal kingdom are classified as endangered. " The least endangered are species that do not appear on Asian menus, such as: As stingrays, or species that live in extreme depths such as. the giant mouth shark. "The threats to sharks and rays are continuing to rise, yet countries around the world are lagging well behind their conservation commitments, especially in terms of catch limits," said Sonja Fordham, vice-chair of SSG. "To turn the tide and allow the recovery of shark and ray populations, the SSG demands immediate national and international catch limits, including complete landfall bans on species considered vulnerable or critically endangered." There is an urgent need for action. "

More Information: https://www.iucnssg.org.

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DiveSSI
Date
27th March 2019
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